Category Archives: Reblogged

Repost: Begegnung in der Schrift – Briefe in digitalen Zeiten (54books)

Kürzlich habe ich für die Kultur- und Literaturwebseite 54books einen Text darüber geschrieben, warum Menschen heutzutage noch händisch private Briefe schreiben. Die von mir beschriebenen Beispiele stammen vornehmlich aus dem englischsprachigen Raum. Ich dachte, dass sich vielleicht auch Leser:innen dieser Webseite dafür interessieren:

“Jeden Morgen lausche ich auf Post, auf das Geräusch, das sie macht, wenn sie durch den Schlitz in unserer Haustür gleitet. Ich hoffe auf persönliche Briefe. Mit der Hand auf Papier geschrieben (oder ausgedruckt, wenn die Hand nicht mitspielt). Oft verrät schon das Schriftbild meiner Adresse, wer mir schreibt. Freunde, Familie. Manchmal öffne ich den Umschlag gleich. Manchmal platziere ich ihn auf dem Küchen- oder Schreibtisch und schaue ihn eine Weile vorfreudig an. Korrespondenz braucht den rechten Moment. […]”

Den Rest des Textes gibt es hier: https://www.54books.de/begegnung-in-der-schrift-briefe-in-digitalen-zeiten/

 

Conference on the Aldine Edition of the Ancient Greek Epistolographers – John Rylands Library, 17 June 2019

Reblogged on ‘What is a letter’.

Lives of Letters

The Aldine Edition of the Ancient Greek Epistolographers: Roots and Legacy

accompanied by an exhibition: “Old and Rare Editions of Ancient Greek Epistolographers”.

Monday 17 June 2019, 10.00 am – 4.00 pm, Christie Room, John Rylands Library, 150 Deansgate, Manchester M3 3EH

The Aldine edition of Greek epistolographers, published in 1499 in Venice, is the first printed edition of most of the 36 letter collections that it contains. Its text was based on earlier medieval epistolaria, and itself formed the basis for most of the subsequent printed editions of the collections it contained. Despite its principal position and importance, the current value of this edition for the study of Greek epistolography is not widely understood. The aims of the Rylands event are to examine collections of ancient Greek epistolographers included in the Aldine and to explore i) the roots of the Aldine edition, ii) its relationship to the medieval Byzantine manuscript epistolary collections, iii) its…

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Originally posted on John Rylands Library Special Collections Blog: Lucy-Kay Brownson, a student on Liverpool University’s Master of Archives and Records Management course, writes: ? In January 2019, as part of my MA programme at Liverpool University, I catalogued a series of First World War correspondence from the Guardian (formerly Manchester Guardian) Archive held at…

via Cataloguing the First World War correspondence of the Manchester Guardian — Lives of Letters

CA & CFP: Melancholy, Love and Letters – International Congress on Soror Mariana Alcoforado (1640–1723), Beja, Portugal – 15–17/11/19

Source of information and text/s: conference website
Name of event: Melancholy, Love and Letters – International Congress on Soror Mariana Alcoforado (1640–1723)
Dates: 15–17 November 2019
Hosts: NOVA University of Lisbon, in collaboration with the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth
Venue: tbc

Description (from the conference website; not edited): The obscure letters a nun from Beja, Portugal, wrote to her fugitive lover build a crescendo of longing, affliction and abandonment, refashioning the pristine motives of medieval Galician-Portuguese «songs of a friend» with a new baroque hypersensitivity. They have attained, since their unauthorized publication in 1669, 350 years ago, an improbable success throughout Europe and the world, sparking fashions, instigating literary and scholarly battles, and inspiring countless imitations and tributes.

About these poignant documents of hopelessness, everything has been questioned: the letters’ authorship and original language; their author’s sex and nation; the authenticity or artifice of the emotions they project; the veracity or fictionality of the biographical and topographic contexts they evoke. Scholars, polemists, literary critics and Mariana’s devotees have put forward strong arguments in favor of various hypotheses concerning the text’s authorship, which have been raised, denied, reformulated, resumed, recombined, and joined also by a growing corpus of recreations that threaten to relegate the text itself to a faded background. Despite this fertile reception, or by virtue of it, Mariana’s passion remains at the center of the gallery of Portuguese love myths, parallel to the tragedy of Pedro and Inês.

Three and a half centuries later, the time has come to rescue the text, reevaluate its authorship, and celebrate the inexhaustible fascination of its themes: volition and desire, expressed through the ancient practice of prayer; the penitent self-examination, trained in the rigorous discipline of confession; and the «contemptus mundi», root and pillar of the cloistered condition. Mariana’s tribulations thus attain the full potential of the four canonical readings: the historical (the unhappy convent romance in Beja), the allegorical (the existential solitude of any individual), the moral (the desperation of lovers facing the impossibility of total union), and the anagogical (the lament of the soul, while abandoned in its earthly exile, yearning for its return to the Creator).

The NOVA University of Lisbon, in collaboration with the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, and with the generous support of Beja Town Council, will hold an International Congress on Soror Mariana Alcoforado in Beja, on 15-17 November 2019, to mark the 350 years of the princeps edition of ‘Lettres portugaises traduites en françois’ (Paris: chez Claude Barbin, 1669). The Portuguese National Library will showcase a related bibliographical exhibition, among other celebrations in Beja, Lisbon and worldwide.

For a description of the conference programme, see their website.

CFP: Please send paper proposals on Mariana Alcoforado, on love letters, or on Beja and Alentejo writers such as Mário Beirão (1890-1965), Luís Amaro (1923-2018), and others to mariana @ missiva.pt by June 30. Include title, 300-word abstract, and a brief bio note. Presentations in Portuguese, English, French, and Spanish will be accepted.

Submitted proposals will be reviewed by July 15 and acceptance decisions will be communicated by e-mail by July 20.

Conference fees: participants, including round trip Lisbon/Beja, 2 nights accommodation, dinner, luncheon and Congress Certificate – 25€; attendees – free (may join the travel, pending availability of places).

CFP: Epistolary Bodies: Letters and Embodiment in the Eighteenth Century, Leicester, 24/05/2019

Source of information: conference website
Date: 24 May 2019
Place: University of Leicester
Organisation: Sarah Goldsmith (Leicester), Sheryllynne Haggerty (Nottingham) and Karen Harvey (Birmingham) – as part of the Midlands Eighteenth-Century Research Network (MECRN).

Description: This interdisciplinary one-day conference explores the relationship between letters and bodies in the long eighteenth century, and the information that can be found about ‘embodiment’, or experiences of the body, in letters. What can letters add to our understanding of eighteenth-century bodies? How might letters allow us to ‘embody’ activities such as work, trade, sociability and worship? How did the form and style of letters shape the knowledge about the body that they communicated? As material objects themselves and often carried on the person, what relationship did letters have with the body? Can bodily states, such as illness, be discerned from the mingled intellectual and mechanical act of writing? Alternatively, consideration might be given to the metaphorical role of bodies in letters in the eighteenth century, in for example, bodies of correspondence or the body politic.

Call for Papers:: Please submit abstracts (max. 300 words) for 20-minute papers to epistolarybodiesconference@gmail.com by 25 February 2019. We also encourage postgraduate students to submit proposals (max. 100 words) for 3-minute lightening talks.

Topics might include:

  • Family letters on domestic, medical or corporeal practices
  • Doctor/patient correspondence
  • Business letters related to trades for the body (dress, food and beauty)
  • Differing discussions of the body as relating to age, gender, religion, politics etc
  • Foreign bodies in travel letters
  • Letters in novels
  • Representations of letters and reading in artwork
  • The material letter
  • The physical act of writing and/or reading
  • The body as a metaphor in letter writing

The event is open to all, and we particularly encourage proposals from the MECRN universities: Birmingham, Birmingham City University, Derby, Nottingham, Nottingham Trent, Leicester, Warwick and Worcester.

Original URL: https://epistolarybodiesconference.wordpress.com/

Reblogged: Anne Murphy on ‘A Page in the Life of Elizabeth Jeake’

Originally posted on the many-headed monster: [In our mini-series ‘A Page in the Life’, each post briefly introduces a new writer and a single page from their manuscript. In this post, Anne Murphy offers a loving letter from a seventeenth-century merchant’s wife, who Anne has discussed in more detail in a recent article and whose…

via A Page in the Life of Elizabeth Jeake: unfeigned love among mercantile matters — Lives of Letters

Rescheduled: Digital Humanities Approaches to Text Editing, 15 May 2018

Sounds very interesting indeed.

Lives of Letters

This workshop was originally due to take place on 2 March, but was rescheduled due to inclement weather. The programme and venue remain the same. If you had signed up to the previous 2 March date, and have already been in touch to confirm you can attend on 15 May, there is no need to sign up again.

Our second workshop of the semester is open for registration via our Google form

Digital Humanities Approaches to Text Editing, 15 May 2018

This workshop will engage participants in a discussion about the future of Digital Humanities approaches to creating and displaying text editions. Three papers will explore best practices developed at a range of projects at Oxford, culminating in a roundtable discussion that looks forward to how similar initiatives can continue to be developed and supported at Manchester.

This event is co-hosted by DH@Manchester and takes place as part of DH…

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Reblogged: Pamela Clemit on ‘Martin Smart, Grammarian, a Correspondent of William Godwin’

The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography is working with The Letters of William Godwin, edited by Pamela Clemit (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011-), to bring new information about Godwin and his correspondence networks to a wider readership. To read more about the project, click here. The second ODNB entry arising from this collaboration has now been published. The […]

via Martin Smart, Grammarian, a Correspondent of William Godwin — Pamela Clemit

Reblogged – Rediscovered: The Tobias Theodores Papers

Originally posted on John Rylands Library Special Collections Blog: Another in our occasional series describing work being undertaken on some of our less well-known collections. Miriam Wildermuth, an Erasmus student from the Humboldt University, Berlin, has recently been working on several projects in Special Collections, including a catalogue of the Tobias Theodores papers. The Theodores…

via Rediscovered: The Tobias Theodores Papers — Lives of Letters

Reposted: Workshop ‘On Letters’, 12-14 April 2018, Hamburg (free of charge)

Date: 12–14 April 2018
Venue:  Centre for the Study of Manuscript Cultures, Warburgstraße 26, Hamburg, Germany

Description:
Besides administrative documents, letters are among the earliest examples of writing in the history of mankind. At the same time this genre was—and still is—of special persistence within almost all manuscript cultures up to the present day. Belonging primarily to the realm of pragmatic handwriting, letters have become a part of what we nowadays define as literature, and, as objects of religious or aesthetic veneration, of art, too. Under the heading of “Epistolography” letters have been studied as a subfield of History and Literature for a long time. This conference, however, will focus on the material side and its accompanying practices, rather than on content.

To cover relevant phenomena from different cultures and periods the workshop will deal with handwritten documents that are meant for more or less immediate communication. Their formal qualities as a whole strive for accessibility and practicability—even in the case of secret letters—, characterised by the tendency to portability and to limited length. A letter in the narrow sense is, with a very few exceptions, per definitionem unique; even if the manuscript is copied, e.g. as a later reference, its original purpose remains to be bound to the single, unique object spanning the distance of senders and addressees.

The production and use of letters—or other comparable documents meant for communication—is dominated by a loose set of polarities, each set providing a continuum by which a given artefact can be defined: open or closed (secret); private or public; written by one’s own hand (“authentic”) or by a second person; for immediate use (expecting direct response) or mainly for documentary purpose; formal or informal, and others.

The workshop will approach the subject from at least three perspectives:

  1. We will consider circumstances of production, including choices of materials, writing styles, and matters of different formats that are all related to the various forms and levels of sender and addressee and their relation, be they areal individual, institutions or imagined or transcendent counterparts. For this part letters are also typically strongly marked by authoriality, both on the material and the textual level.
  2. We will consider circumstances of use, including the relation of transmission and materiality, especially means of protection and the integrity of devices of authentication (envelopes, seals and the like). Besides activities that involve reading (aloud or silent) the most interesting point concerns strategies of safekeeping and archiving. The personal and fragile character of these physical objects has led at an early stage to a compilation of letters as parts of multiple-text manuscripts (MTM), worth a more detailed investigation.
  3. As a third perspective we would like to discuss phenomena on a more general level, e.g. the role of transmission and adoption of techniques of letter writing between different manuscript cultures, and the development and use of anthologies of formulae, letter writing guides etc., both as material objects by themselves and as instruction guides containing information on material aspects.

Focusing on the relation between material aspects and social practices involving letters the workshop intends to deepen our understanding of the interaction of pragmatic and literate manuscripts from a comparative perspective.

To download the programme and abstracts, to register, and for further information, click here.

URL of original post: https://www.manuscript-cultures.uni-hamburg.de/register_letters2018.html