Monthly Archives: April 2016

Call for posters: Digital Epistolary Network

Postgraduate students and early career researchers are invited to propose posters for a one-day, student-run conference exploring how we engage with letters in the digital age.

The conference takes an inclusive and interdisciplinary approach, considering letters from antiquity to the present day. It seeks to promote collaborative dialogue between academics, archivists, publishers, and the public, and to facilitate illuminating discussion from inside and outside the academic sphere – including opinion from individuals who write, read, reveal and research correspondence in their professional or personal lives. Through a focus on the conflicted and changing role of the letter as a private and public mode of written communication, the conference accommodates various perspectives: historical, anthropological, literary, archival, political, and many others. In this way, our consideration of correspondence will encompass the various digital and analogue methods for recording, interpreting, and presenting a specific material document and its inherent social connections, as well as an assessment of the ways in which recent developments in digital modes of communication have influenced, disrupted, or enhanced our relationship with this traditional form.

Confirmed speakers include: Professor Howard Hotson (Cultures of Knowledge); Miranda Lewis (Early Modern Letters Online); Dr Robert McNamee (Electronic Enlightenment), Dr Alison Pearn (Darwin Correspondence Project), Rupert Mann (Digital Programme Director, Oxford University Press), Kieron Smith (Digital Director, Blackwell’s).

Selected posters will be printed for display and informal discussion during an evening drinks reception at Wolfson College, and their scope could include (but is not limited to) the following correspondence-based topics:

  • Analysis of a letter or selection of letters (if present in the Bodleian collections, these materials could also be included in an exhibition accompanying the conference).
  • Methodologies for working with correspondence material in any field.
  • Consideration of letters as a source for life-writing or historical research.
  • Implications (theoretical or practical) of editing correspondence in digital or print media.
  • Presentation or discussion of digital manipulation of correspondence data and metadata (corpus and network analysis, visualizations, translation, etc.).
  • Reflections on the significance of correspondence within personal, public, or fictional lives.
  • Comparisons between letters and other (digital) forms of communication.

Please send abstracts of 200-300 words to posters [at] epistolary [dot] net outlining the research your poster will present, by Friday 13th May. Preference will be given to research that demonstrably crosses disciplinary boundaries and uses diverse techniques. Posters can be landscape or portrait and should be A1 size. Printing costs (if required) will be covered, as well as the presenter’s conference attendance and limited travel expenses.


URL of original post: http://www.e-pistolary.net/speaking-in-absence/call-for-posters/

More information about the conference: http://www.e-pistolary.net/speaking-in-absence/

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Reblogged Guest Post: John Bugg, ‘The Generosity of Joseph Johnson’ — Pamela Clemit

Joseph Johnson’s bookshop at 72 St Paul’s Churchyard, London, served as a hub for some of the most important writers and artists of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. William Godwin’s diary records his attendance at Johnson’s monthly dinners from the mid-1790s to around 1810. (The tradition was continued, after Johnson’s death in 1809, by his great-nephew … Continue reading Guest Post: John Bugg, ‘The Generosity of Joseph Johnson’

via Guest Post: John Bugg, ‘The Generosity of Joseph Johnson’ — Pamela Clemit

Reblogged: Catriona Seth, ‘Royal Secrets: Marie-Antoinette’s exchanges with ambassador Mercy’ — Enlightenment Correspondences

Happy Trinity Term! Our first Enlightenment Correspondences Network meeting will take place already on Tuesday of First Week (26 April): Professor Catriona Seth (All Souls, Oxford) will be telling us about her current work on ‘Royal Secrets: Marie-Antoinette’s exchanges with ambassador Mercy’. The meeting will begin at 1 p.m. (note the later time) at Ertegun […]

via Catriona Seth, ‘Royal Secrets: Marie-Antoinette’s exchanges with ambassador Mercy’ — Enlightenment Correspondences

Upcoming workshop: The graphic evidence of childhood, 1760-1914

THE GRAPHIC EVIDENCE OF CHILDHOOD, 1760-1914
Palatine Learning Centre
Durham University
Friday, 15 April 2016

This event is sponsored by Durham University’s Institute of Advanced Study, the Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies, the Centre for Visual Arts and Culture, and the Department of Philosophy.

TOPICS AND SPEAKERS

8:45-9:20 Coffee

9:20-9:30 INTRODUCTORY COMMENTS

Dr Matthew Daniel Eddy
Durham University

9:30-11:00 SESSION 1

Chair and Comments
Dr Matthew Daniel Eddy
Durham University

Prof Matthew Grenby
Newcastle University
Looking Glass for the Mind, or Unintellectual Mirror:
Interpreting Children’s Marginalia

Prof Kathryn Gleadle
Oxford University
Tactical agents?
Juvenile Creativity and the Politics of the Diary

11:00-11:30 Coffee Break

11:30-1:00 SESSION 2

Chair and Comments
Dr Lutz Sauerteig, Durham University

Dr Marie Isabel Matthews-Schlinzig
Durham University
The Correspondence of J.G. Herder’s Children – A Family Matter

Dr Siân Pooley
Oxford University
‘Letters are thought-bearers’:
Feeling, Thinking and Printing in England c.1870-1914

1:00-2:00 Lunch

2:00-4:00 SESSION 3

Chair and Comments
Dr Melanie Keene, Cambridge University

Dr Barbara Gribling
Durham University
Playing with the Past:
Toys, Games and Children’s Engagement with British History

Prof Barbara Wittmann
Humbolt University, Berlin
Children’s Drawings and the Human Sciences

Dr Rebecca Gowland and Benn Penny-Mason
Durham University
Excluded Bodies:
Bioarchaeological Evidence for Physical and Cognitive Impediments to Education

4:00 CONCLUSION

OBJECTIVES
The history of childhood has become an important field of study in recent years. One of its exciting characteristics is that it attracts researchers from a rich variety of disciplines, including the humanities, the social sciences and the human sciences. Consequently, the history of childhood emotion, puberty, selfhood, health and agency has become more visible, both inside and outside the academy. Yet, with the rising popularity of childhood history comes a growing concern about the kinds of evidence that can be used to reconstruct the lives of children. This concern is increasingly intimated by scholars who research the material and visual foundations of childhood. They point out that many histories of pre-twentieth-century childhood often fail to engage directly with evidence that was made or (conclusively) used by girls and boys, either in specialised settings or on a daily basis.

This workshop seeks to develop and extend the material and visual history of childhood by focusing on the kinds of graphic evidence that was made or used by children during the 18th and 19th centuries. The notion of ‘graphic’ will be interpreted widely to mean the instruments, skills or materials used to manually represent knowledge on paper (or similar forms of media) through writing or drawing. The papers will discuss how graphic artefacts can be used as childhood evidence and/or to what extent graphic materials and techniques can be used to historicise how children experienced the world through the act of making or using an object. To keep the discussion focused, each speaker is invited to concentrate on a specific graphic genre of her choosing, and to consider how the genre can be used to analyse the legitimacy and efficacy of current methods used to reconstruct the history of childhood.

REGISTRATION (£15)
The registration fee includes tea breaks and lunch. To register, please send your name, institutional affiliation, postal address, email address and £15 cash to: Ms Laura Dearlove, Department of Philosophy, 50/51 Old Elvet, Durham, DH1 3HN, UK. For health and safety reasons, all payments must be received no later than Monday 11 April 2015.

FURTHER INFORMATION
For further information, please contact the workshop organiser, Dr Matthew Daniel Eddy, at m.d.eddy@durham.ac.uk

Information sourced via the Children’s History Society UK